Education hasn’t seen true disruption. Yet.

2 thoughts on “Education hasn’t seen true disruption. Yet.”

  1. “Why sit in a lecture with 40 students all at different levels of understanding when I can move through a focused, personalized, adaptive curriculum at my own pace?” Are you creating a straw man? 1) Learning is not only about the individual and his or her own preferences, 2) not all classrooms are lecture, and 3) there is much to be gained from f2f interaction with others. Might your approach be as limiting as the one you criticize?

    1. I agree with you, Kay, about the diversity of learning environments on a college campus (not necessarily about the straw man!).

      Disruptive innovation typically focuses on one piece – low hanging fruit ready for change – not the whole. The viability of large lecture courses impacts the viability of the entire enterprise.

      Deep learning usually happens when students are faced with new information that demands altering their conceptual frameworks or adjusting how they see the world. That happens best in those settings where a professor knows the class, can engage them in big questions or problems, and gives them the opportunity to discuss, wrestle with ideas, and create new solutions and projects together. That’s hard to do online.

      However, most colleges have both. They support the “rich” learning environments with some larger, lecture-based classes. That kind of environment may happen better online, where the learning can be individualized (immediate feedback, explore areas you know less, move quickly in areas you know well, self-paced). What happens when a campus can no longer subsidize the resource-intensive, face-to-face classes with the larger “cash-cows” that are easier on budgets and classroom space?

      I believe campuses need to look at both – deep learning in a face-to-face setting, and personalized learning enhanced by technology.

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